Sunday, April 05, 2009


More on 'Fascism in the Arab world'

More on Fascism in the Arab world

The Muslim Brotherhood, Nazis and Al-Qaeda [2004] The Arab Nazis had much in common with the new Nazi doctrines. …. So, in 1985, when I was testifyoing before Congress exposing European Nazis on the CIA … as the front group in the United States for the Palestinian Islamic Jihad. …. Al Qaeda is nothing more than the religious expression of Arab Fascism. …

The Swastika and the Crescent

Muslim and Neo-Nazi extremists unite

ESSAY - May 2002

By Martin A. Lee

…Ahmed Huber: Neo-Nazi, Islamic convert…

The roots of the Muslim Brotherhood and, in many ways, the Nazi-Muslim axis go back to the organisation’s formation in Egypt in 1928. Marking the start of modern political “Islamic fundamentalism,” the Brotherhood from the outset envisioned a time when an Islamic state would prevail in Egypt and other Arab countries. The growth of the Muslim Brotherhood coincided with the rise of fascist movements in Europe - a parallel noted by Muhammad Sa’id al-’Ashmawy, former chief justice of Egypt’s High Criminal Court, who decried “the perversion of Islam” and “the fascistic ideology” that infuses the world view of the Brothers.

Youssef Nada, current board chairman of Al Taqwa, had joined the armed branch of the Muslim Brotherhood as a young man in Egypt during World War II. Nada and several of his cohorts in the Sunni Muslim fraternity were recruited by German military intelligence. Hassan al-Banna, the Egyptian schoolteacher who founded the Muslim Brotherhood, also collaborated with spies of the Third Reich.

Advocating a pan-Islamic insurgency in British-controlled Palestine, the Brotherhood proclaimed their support for the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin Al-Husseini, in the late 1930s. The Grand Mufti, the preeminent religious figure among Palestinian Muslims, was the most notable Arab leader to seek an alliance with Nazi Germany.

Although he loathed Arabs (he once described them as “lacquered half-apes who ought to be whipped”), Hitler understood that he and the Mufti shared the same rivals - the British, the Jews and the Communists. They met in Berlin, where the Mufti lived in exile during the war. The Mufti agreed to help organise a special Muslim division of the Waffen SS. Powerful radio transmitters were put at the Mufti’s disposal so that his pro-Axis propaganda could be heard throughout the Arab world.

Eurabia: the Euro-Arab axis by Bat Yeʼor

Page 42

… the network that had united European Nazis and fascists with Arabs before World War II was reemerging. In the early 1950s, many Nazi criminals…

Page 75

… and neo-Nazis. As we have seen, the Euro-Arab cooperation and alliance was from its inception also directed against America. For the Arabs, Euro-Arab …

‘Reference Guide to the Nazis and Arabs During the Holocaust’ By Shelomo Alfassa

Page 24

• A Pan-Arab Committee established at Baghdad in the Spring of 1933 approached Fritz Grobba, the German Ambassador to Iraq, two years later with proposals for closer ties and cooperation.

• Hitler’s Mein Kampf was translated into four different Arabic translations…

Page 25

18 • Anti-Jewish feeling mounted in parts of the Middle East during the 1930s, as the Fascist and Nazi regimes and doctrines made increasing sense to many Arab nationalists

Page 27

In 1937, the Arabs almost immediately rejected the [Peel Plan for the partition of Palestine] and a pan-Arab conference in Syria in September resolved that every Arab had a sacred duty to preserve Palestine as an Arab country.

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